US Army Corps of Engineers
Memphis District

Highlights

Happy Birthday Memphis District
We're Hiring! Job seekers can search openings with the district on USAJobs.gov or by clicking on the “Jobs” link in the upper right column of this page.
The Memphis District has been designated a Best Place to Work in Federal Government for the last three years.
Jamie Evans explains how an inclinometer pipe with spider magnets attached works. Sections of pipe are connected and pushed 85 feet down boreholes to measure soil movement.

Did You Know?

The new special edition Army Corps of Engineers USA Today is now available. Click image to read.

 

Did You Know?

 

The Memphis District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has served the citizens of the Mid-South region since 1882. The $100-million annual mission of its 450 employees is to minimize flood risk, keep America’s most vital inland navigation highway – the Mississippi River – open for navigation and to preserve our environment for future generations.

 

Blog Posts

Chrisco takes Director Safety Award
11/5/2019 UPDATED
Physical Support Branch Marine Facilities Specialist Chad Chrisco was recently awarded the Director of Army Safety Risk Management Safety Award for his efforts during Ensley Engineer Yard string-out...
Romona Oring is October Employee of the Month
11/4/2019
Wynne Area Office Administrative Support Assistant Romona Oring is the Memphis District Employee of the Month for October. District Commander Col. Zachary Miller traveled to the Area Office to...
District has powerful new survey tool
9/30/2019
Have you ever watched one of those documentary television programs where researchers have a cool laser gizmo that spins on a tripod and maps the inside of a prehistoric cave or the outside of an...
Biologists check for endangered mussels
9/30/2019
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers employees perform a lot of interesting jobs related to the rivers we work on. But one of the most unusual jobs involves looking for an endangered species of fresh water...
Corps of Engineers completes Poinsett County Ditch 10 cleanout ahead of schedule, under budget
9/30/2019
On U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contractors have completed maintenance work to cleanout Ditch 10 in Poinsett County, west of Trumann, Arkansas, 70 days ahead of schedule and $44,546 under budget....
District Commander participates in launch of new shipboard water quality monitoring system
9/24/2019
Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller joined officials from the U.S. Geological Survey and a group of Mississippi River city mayors at a press conference Monday (Sept. 16) to announce the...
Team Recognition
9/24/2019
IN THE PHOTO: Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller (fourth from left) poses with members of the District Team after presenting each with a Certificate of Appreciation and On-the-Spot Award...

Latest News Releases

Army Corps of Engineers waives day use fees at recreation areas in observance of Veterans Day
11/6/2019
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) announced today that it will waive day use fees at its more than 2,850 USACE-operated recreation areas nationwide in observance of Veterans Day, November 11....
Corps of Engineers completes Poinsett County Ditch 10 cleanout ahead of schedule, under budget
9/27/2019
On U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contractors have completed maintenance work to cleanout Ditch 10 in Poinsett County, west of Trumann, Arkansas, 70 days ahead of schedule and $44,546 under budget....

Photos

The Motor Vessel Goodwin tends the Clearing & Snagging Unit at Bauxippi-Wyanoke revetment site near West Memphis. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Memphis District’s Clearing and Snagging Unit works on the river bank near West Memphis, Arkansas, Oct. 10. As the first step of Revetment Operations, crew members clear the river banks of trees and debris to make way for the Bank Grading Unit and the Matt Sinking Unit. The work’s accomplished using a barge mounted dragline, bulldozers, and backhoes. Revetment Operations normally run from July to November each year. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Old revetment has deteriorated, allowing the forces of the river to slowly chip away. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Removing vegetation that has encroached upon the work site. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
In the foreground, the River & Harbors Construction & Maintenance Foreman oversees operations. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintenance Center's Plant Section in operation. Deckhand Marcus Grant passes tie off cable to Brandon Carmack as Motor Vesel Lusk faces up against the Revetment Mooring Barge 7401. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintenance Center's Plant Section in operation. Motor Vessel Lusk and Motor Vessel Strong face up on both ends of the Revetment Mooring Barge 7401 removing it from dry dock 5801. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintenance Center's Plant Section in operation. Mooring barge being towed into place after coming off dry dock 5801. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
In the pilot house of the USACE Memphis District Dredge Hurley, Stacye Sinn operates the suction to remove silt from the channel as Kendall Turman keeps the Dredge on course.
USACE Memphis District Dredge Hurley
USACE Memphis District Dredge Hurley
USACE Memphis District Dredge Hurley
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Mat Sinking Unit (MSU), based in the Vicksburg District, is currently in drydock at the Memphis District Ensley Engineer Yard in Memphis.

Memphis and Vicksburg Districts are working together to perform routine maintenance on this unique piece of equipment in order to get it ready for the summer revetment work season.

The MSU is used to install great sheets of concrete mattress on the riverbank to shield it from erosion and sloughing caused by channel currents and turbulent water associated with river flood stages.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Mat Sinking Unit (MSU), based in the Vicksburg District, is currently in drydock at the Memphis District Ensley Engineer Yard in Memphis.

Memphis and Vicksburg Districts are working together to perform routine maintenance on this unique piece of equipment in order to get it ready for the summer revetment work season.

The MSU is used to install great sheets of concrete mattress on the riverbank to shield it from erosion and sloughing caused by channel currents and turbulent water associated with river flood stages.
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintenance Center's Plant Section in operation. Motor Vessel Strong pushes Revetment Mooring Barge 7401 off dry dock 5801. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintnenace Center's Plant Section in operation. With revetment season over, Revetment Mooring Barge 7401 sits on dry dock 5801 for minor repairs. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
Ensley Engineer Yard and Marine Maintenance Center's Plant Section in operation. Crew prepares for safety meeting preceding the undocking of Revetment Mooring Barge 7401. From L to R:  Gerald Townsell, Royalle Woods, Shawn Morgan, Terrance Knowlton, Levin Collins, Ray Boice, Richard Perfetti, Earl Washington, Robert Woods, Brian Libby, Guy Nadler, Ken Greenwalt, Jack Wilkerson, Richard Qualls, and Ed Blake. (USACE Photo/Brenda Beasley)
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