Memphis Builders: Behind the Mask II

Published May 1, 2020
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IN THE PHOTO, Low Voltage Technician Nick Marcy routes network cable for patient beds on the fourth floor of the Alternate Care Facility in Memphis, Tennessee. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THE PHOTO, Low Voltage Technician Nick Marcy routes network cable for patient beds on the fourth floor of the Alternate Care Facility in Memphis, Tennessee. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THE PHOTO, Low Voltage Technician Hunter Dunkin gathers cable for routing on the second floor of the Alternate Care Facility in Memphis, Tennessee. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THE PHOTO, Low Voltage Technician Hunter Dunkin gathers cable for routing on the second floor of the Alternate Care Facility in Memphis, Tennessee. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

Building this FEMA-assigned Alternate Care Facility requires a great variety of skill sets; that’s quite obvious to most people. What isn’t so obvious is just how many of one skill set a person can find in a matter of two days and two floors worth of construction workers.

After meeting Anthony Bell on Tuesday this week, the Low Voltage Technician from Memphis, I thought that was a pretty unique job title to be honest. I’d actually never heard of it before.

Let me introduce you to two more low voltage technicians, Hunter Dunkin, who I found working on the second floor, and Nick Marcy, who I saw on a ladder gathering cable on the fourth floor.

There are no identifying characteristics, at least from what I can tell, that would make one stand out as a low voltage technician, so it isn’t as though I was approaching these gentlemen on purpose. Nonetheless, we are still going to meet them.

Dunkin lives here in Memphis and says he feels good about being part of this project. And don’t bother making a joke about his last name; he’s heard it all before – many times.

Marcy also lives here in Memphis. He’s glad to be part of this project as well because he thinks it’s for a good cause, even though it is stressful and brings on long hours.

“We all knew it was gonna be a mess but we knew it was gonna be worth it,” Marcy said. “I also have a four year old so I try to spend a few hours with her after I get off work at night whenever I can. It’s hard but I do what I can.”

The Memphis District knows how much of a sacrifice it can be working on this facility, and we are beyond appreciative for all the work this team puts forth each and every day.

Again, the Memphis District would love to hear from our supporters. We can be reached via mail at U.S Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District, Attn: Public Affairs Office, 167 N. Main St., B-202, Memphis, TN 38103-894 or via email at MemphisPAO@usace.army.mil. 

We value your support, Memphis. As always, stay safe, and stay strong.