US Army Corps of Engineers
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  • April

    Rescue revetment task order awarded

    The Memphis District recently awarded a task order to restore existing revetment and repair over-steepened banks along the Mississippi River in Coahoma County, Mississippi, and Phillips County, Arkansas. A total of $1,344,000 was awarded on the current River Repairs IDIQ (Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity) Contract to Midwest Construction Company.
  • A look back: Woods’ 40 years of service

    "He is very honest, punctual, and works to improve his skills," Supply Technician Matthew Davis said. "He has a real caring spirit. He took me under his wing when I was new, made sure I had lunch, and even drove me home a couple of times when my car had broken down. He is an all-around good guy, and I will miss him if he ever leaves." Davis is talking about Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic Leader Robert Woods. Woods is the working leaderman in the Tractor Shop, performing duties as a mechanic and overseeing all other mechanics in the Yards and Docks Unit. He's been doing so for a little more than 40 years now.
  • July

    Bank Grading Unit paves way for commerce, safety

    Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller recently visited Island 68, a project site in Arkansas, where he met with the district’s hardworking Bank Grading Unit and reviewed progress made at the site thus far. According to Project Manager and River/Civil Engineer Cole Stonebrook, we have done work here before as this area is particularly erosive and scours easily in moving water. “The soils in the area are very unstable and highly erosive,” he said. “We are addressing a large bank failure by grading irregularities in the bank alignment to a smooth straight alignment. The Grading Unit is grading the banks to a one on four slope,  which requires moving 220,000 cubic yards of material.”
  • June

    Memphis Revetment Season in full swing

    The Memphis District Revetment season officially began this year on June 11, with District Commander Col. Zachary Miller hosting a kickoff meeting at the Ensley Engineer Yard to get things started. “Protecting the Mississippi River banks keeps the channel in place, which maintains the necessary depth and alignment that allows the thousands of tows to travel up and down the river year round,” the commander said. “Without this work, the river would shift resulting in new, shallow cutoffs that could not be safely traveled.”