Corps, multiple teams ready to construct Memphis ACF

Published April 19, 2020
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IN THIS PHOTO, Memphis District Commander Col. Zachery Miller has his temperature taken at the former Commercial Appeal building.All individuals entering the building are required to get their temperature taken. If a person demonstrates a high temperature, he or she is denied access to the building.(USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, Chief Operating Officer of the City of Memphis Doug McGowen, Memphis District Commander Col. Zachery Miller, and Emergency Manager Steve Barry discuss the challenges of constructing the Memphis Alternate Care Facility, unique in that it's the first ACF not being built on the A2HC or H2HC model. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, Construction Company AECOM Hunt Vice President Doug Utt led a group to the fourth floor where much demolition was taking place. He explained lots would be removed to include old lighting, flooring, dropped ceiling, and unwanted walls. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, City and State Officials line up along with members of the Medical team to get their temperatures taken before entering the Commercial Appeal building. All individuals entering the building are required to get their temperature taken. If a person demonstrates a high temperature, he or she is denied access to the building.(USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, Lt. Col. Robert Tomsett and Capt. James Barrett get their temperature taken prior to entering the site. All individuals entering the building are required to get their temperature taken. If a person demonstrates a high temperature, he or she is denied access to the building.(USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, Construction Company AECOM Hunt Vice President Doug Utt discusses building plans with the group, including Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller (right front), prior to reviewing the site. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, The group of contractors, Corps employees and state/city official talk right outside of the area where the oxygen tanks will be stored. Oxygen and asphalt, or any petroleum product is flammable because of self-oxidation, so the corps will be placing steel spillage plates under the tanks to keep the asphalt and tanks separate. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, This is the receiving area for what the construction company calls 'wraparound services'. Wraparound services include everything from linen and garbage to prepackaged food and other essential supplies.(USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, The fourth floor of the Alternate Care Facility has been designate as a patient care area.(USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, This area of the former Commercial Appeal Building will be for ambulances and patient drop-off. There if a ramp leading into this area located behind the group. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

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IN THIS PHOTO, Construction Company AECOM Hunt Vice President Doug Utt (center) reviews the plans for the third floor of the building, which is designated to be the building's Intensive Care Unit. All flooring on this unit will be removed and replaced with vinyl flooring. All interior walls are also scheduled to be removed. Additionally, every patient unit is planned to have oxygen inline gases. (USACE photo by Jessica Haas)

As the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District continues to work in support of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) - and in coordination with other federal, state, local, tribal partners, and our prime contractor AECOM – to build Memphis' Alternate Care Facility and to synchronize the interagency response to the COVID-19 Pandemic, multiple teams came together yesterday to meet and prepare for a very busy month ahead.

This former Commercial Appeal building is unique and different from other Alternate Care Facility projects in that it's not a dormitory nor is it an arena. It is an industrial site that will require much more demolition, including the removal of unwanted walls, dropped ceiling, old lighting, and flooring.

Coordination and teamwork were the themes of the day yesterday. Each team there had to work with the others in order to make this entire facility work in the end.

The contractor can't build the right type of facility if they don't know what the medical team needs in terms of nursing stations, for example. And the state won't know what to buy for the facility until both the contractor and the medical teams tell them what is needed.

This project is a team effort, and yesterday was a perfect example of what working as a team is supposed to look like.