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  • November

    Mississippi Valley Division’s R5: Forging ahead for FY21

    The week of Oct. 19 – 23 was bustling at Vicksburg District headquarters as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division (MVD) and District leaders convened for the annual major subordinate command (MSC) Regional Governance Boards known as R5. If you aren’t familiar with the R5, the purpose of the meeting is a financial, program, and project review of the previous fiscal year (FY) and an assessment of the upcoming three FYs with a focus on the direction of the organization through the development of Lines of Effort (LoE).
  • Memphis District awards several critical service contracts

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District recently awarded five service contracts in Missouri and Arkansas to maintain and improve upon the Mississippi River and Tributaries (MR&T) Project.
  • October

    A birthday to remember

    As children, we grow up dreaming of what we want to be when we grow up. When we set our sights on something and become passionate about it, nothing can get in our way. One Memphis District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers child is very interested in police officers, to say the least. Anything having to do with the police, he loves it.
  • USACE supports storm survivors with safe structures

    Responding to disasters is one of several missions the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is tasked with. Part of answering this call is through specialized teams that go out and conduct infrastructure assessments in disaster areas. "On Aug. 29, the Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) deployed an Infrastructure Assessment Planning and Response Team (PRT) management cell to Louisiana," Infrastructure Assessment Action Officer Doug Weber said. "When I first started on the Infrastructure Assessment team, I thought it was all about placarding peoples’ homes for safety, " Mission Specialist Adrienne Murphy said. "But in our last two deployments, we’ve been asked to perform inspections of drinking water systems, wastewater systems, and public facilities like hospitals and fire stations."
  • Remembering our Memphis District brothers and sister

    Members of the Memphis District gathered for a memorial yesterday morning at the Clifford-Davis Odell Horton Federal Building to honor and remember seven teammates, who to many of us were family, that we unfortunately lost over the last year. An additional ceremony was held later in the day at the Ensley Engineer Yard to dedicate a newly planted tree to those seven fallen teammates. The tree was planted to replace the first commemorative tree, dedicated to all deceased U.S. Army Corps of Engineers members who had served proudly. That tree had 'lived it's given life' and was unfortunately uprooted during a strong storm in years past.
  • September

    Blue Roof recipients witness USACE innovation

    Innovating and improving processes are what the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers do, especially when it comes to hurricane recovery operations. So when it came time to respond to a Hurricane like Laura, the Corps came ready to deliver temporary roofing with an upgraded Blue Roof Program.
  • Local Government Liaisons reach the hearts of communities

    Often during disaster response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Planning and Response Teams such as, temporary emergency power, debris removal and Operation Blue Roof are the Corps activities in the limelight; however, the little-known and little-seen Local Government Liaison, or LGL, national cadre is operating in the background, providing a critical lifeline of communication between Federal Emergency Management Agency, the state, local officials, and the Corps.
  • USACE provides power to hard-hit Louisiana

    Living in the 21st century, most Americans have electricity on demand. When it isn’t working, it usually doesn’t take longer than a day to get it turned back on. But what happens when a storm like Hurricane Laura hits? Close to 200,000 residents living in southwestern Louisiana lost power on Aug. 27. Many of them are still without it, weeks after the storm has come and gone. Delivering power to southwest Louisiana is one of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' top priorities. USACE is installing generators in several critical facilities like water pump stations, sewage lift stations, hospitals, radio towers, and corrections facilities, to name a few. The 23-person team responsible for installing these generators ensured they were in Louisiana before Hurricane Laura even made landfall.
  • First temporary ‘Blue Roof’ a success

    “The governor happened to have a news conference and my wife said, well what about the blue roofs?” Duhon said. “She gave me the information and I got online and registered and here we are today.” The purpose of the program is to provide homeowners in disaster areas with fiber-reinforced sheeting to cover damaged roofs until permanent repairs can be made. The deadline to sign up for the Blue Roof Program is Sept. 21. Don't wait!
  • August

    Memphis Team deployed to Louisiana in support of Hurricane Laura relief efforts

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis District deployed a 13-member Emergency Power Planning and Response Team (PRT) to support Federal Emergency Management Agency's Hurricane Laura response, on Aug 26.
  • A look back: Williams' 30+ years of service

    "If you walk around this vessel, chances are you will find him working somewhere around here, even when he is off the watch," Dredge Hurley Assistant Master Tim Tucker said. "We sometimes have to make him stop to go to his room to relax after a long day. If some of the kids coming out of high school these days would show up with half of the work ethic that he has, we would really get a lot more done." Tucker is describing Curtis Williams, who is also known by many on the dredge as "Lil Wolf". Williams is the Dredge Hurley's ship keeper and has been with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for a little more than 30 years.
  • A look back: Hamilton’s 35 years of service

    Hamilton was born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957, and later adopted by his parents at the young age of six months. "I grew up here in Wynne, where the (USACE) Area Office is located (and now where he works)," he said. "And I graduated from Arkansas State University in 1982."
  • Contract awarded for Old Town Seepage Remediation project

    Congratulations to the Old Town Seepage Remediation Project Delivery Team on reaching their Contract Award Milestone for their project located in Arkansas and Cotton Belt Levee District Number One. The project team awarded the $5,042,556 contract to the Sytes Corporation. The project involves extending the existing seepage remediation berm. The slated begin date for construction is Oct. 16 this year, with a tentative completion date of April 2023.
  • July

    Providing solutions worldwide

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ vision is, “Engineering solutions for our Nation’s toughest challenges.” Not only does this vision relate to challenges here in the United States, but it applies to those encountered all over the world. Part of working toward that vision asks our employees to deploy and sometimes work for and with other agencies overseas. Recently, two members of the Memphis District volunteered to do just that.
  • June

    Memphis Revetment Season in full swing

    The Memphis District Revetment season officially began this year on June 11, with District Commander Col. Zachary Miller hosting a kickoff meeting at the Ensley Engineer Yard to get things started. “Protecting the Mississippi River banks keeps the channel in place, which maintains the necessary depth and alignment that allows the thousands of tows to travel up and down the river year round,” the commander said. “Without this work, the river would shift resulting in new, shallow cutoffs that could not be safely traveled.”
  • Following in dad's footsteps: A tour of MVM

    Cpt. Alex Burruss was supposed to move to Ft. Hood, Texas, but due to the Coronavirus situation, Army priorities quickly shifted and the captain found himself moving to Tennessee instead. “I was excited, but also a little frustrated,” he explained. “However, I saw Lt. Gen. Semonite discussing the Alternate Care Site mission on the news and knew that we were -are- living in a unique time in history and that it would take a national-level effort to beat COVID-19.”
  • May

    A look back: Marshall’s 40 years of service

    “First and foremost, what inspired me was the veterans,” Marshall said. “While serving as a purchasing agent in the Prosthetics Department of the VA, I enjoyed helping the veterans get the products, medicines, home alterations, and equipment they needed. Providing equipment for the blind and handicapped, and seeing their appreciation for the small things filled my heart with joy.  I enjoyed having input in the selection of the equipment provided, and enjoyed informing them of products or services they were unaware that they may have qualified for.”  Contract Specialist Valerie Marshall recently celebrated 40 years of federal service, so we decided to step back and take a look at how she spent those years, as we are very grateful for her service to the Memphis District as well as to this nation.
  • Fisk Scour Repair Project is Ready-to-Advertise

    Reaching a project milestone is the result of successive interim achievements along the way. Successive interim achievements have propelled the Fisk Scour Repair Project Delivery Team (PDT) to successfully reach its important Ready-to-Advertise milestone on May 15.
  • New Supplemental Program Manager, Programs Management Branch

    Simmerman began his career as a Civil Engineer in the Survey Section, where he completed a year and a half “intern” rotational assignment rotating through various Memphis District Offices. Andy has also worked on the Mississippi River Channel Improvement Project and has served over four years as a Project Manager working on projects in Eastern Arkansas, mainly the Grand Prairie Project and White River Comprehensive Study, as well as the St. Johns New Madrid Project.
  • April

    Memphis Builders: Behind the mask

    Walking around the Alternate Care Facility construction site, people are usually focused on what workers are doing, not so much the people themselves. And if you’re like me, you’re also very focused on the ground as you don’t want to trip and fall over something as simple as a little cord. But, it’s important to get to know the people doing the work. They are the ones making this facility a reality after all. They are also the people sacrificing time with their families, working 12 hours a day and seven days a week.