US Army Corps of Engineers
Memphis District Website

Results:
Tag: Tennessee
Clear
  • May

    Developmental position to offer growth, new skills for USACE employee

    Many U.S. Army Corps of Engineers employees are eager to learn new skills and grow in their position. Fortunately, the Memphis District oftentimes offers opportunities for its employees to do just that through what's called developmental assignments and/or positions. A developmental position is a temporary job that differs from their permanent position and is designed to train and develop employees in preparation for further career advancement. These temporary positions normally last about 120 days, but can be shorter or longer depending on the position. Additionally, the job location can either be at the employee’s home station or in a completely different state. While the differences vary from position to position, one thing remains the same, the benefits of working a developmental assignment are endless. Recently, Memphis District Procurement Analyst TiJuana' TJ' Harris was provided the chance to apply for a 120-day developmental assignment at the division level, where she said she would learn even more about the "whys" of USACE contracting.
  • April

    Memphis District Hurley: Thawed out and ready to dredge

    During most off seasons, maintaining the Hurley takes a few months and a couple of crews to get everything done. This off-season was a bit different, as unexpected weather posed more obstacles than usual. Much of the south, including Memphis, Tennessee, was hit hard with frigid temperatures in mid-February this year. The last time Memphians experienced weather like this was in 1994.  From frozen pipes to no electricity, many people and structures were impacted by the icy weather, including the district’s Dredge Hurley.
  • A look back: Woods’ 40 years of service

    "He is very honest, punctual, and works to improve his skills," Supply Technician Matthew Davis said. "He has a real caring spirit. He took me under his wing when I was new, made sure I had lunch, and even drove me home a couple of times when my car had broken down. He is an all-around good guy, and I will miss him if he ever leaves." Davis is talking about Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic Leader Robert Woods. Woods is the working leaderman in the Tractor Shop, performing duties as a mechanic and overseeing all other mechanics in the Yards and Docks Unit. He's been doing so for a little more than 40 years now.
  • A Captain's role in an ACF build-out

    Editors Note: April 6, 2020 was the day the Memphis District awarded the contract to build an Alternate Care Facility (ACF) in Memphis, Tennessee. The article below was written by Cpt. Alex Burruss, who at that time deployed to the Memphis District to work as an Operations Officer and assist with ACF projects and operations. This is his account of what happened during his few months working here. At the onset of the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the U.S.  Army Corps of Engineers. USACE collaborated with the Federal Emergency Management Agency to develop a plan for the rapid expansion of COVID-19 treatment spaces. USACE assigned each of its districts an area of responsibility, and the districts integrated into the local and state response agencies within their areas of responsibility. As local civil authorities conducted analysis and projected bed space requirements, USACE developed facility modification options for accommodating additional beds. Districts completed site assessments and provided project management support for converting existing buildings into alternate care facilities (ACFs).  In April 2020, three weeks after the President declared a national emergency, the U.S. Army Engineer School (USAES), Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, deployed more than 30 Soldiers in support of the USACE response effort; Cpt. Alex W. Burruss was deployed to the Memphis District, USACE Mississippi Valley Division, Tennessee, for more than 60 days.
  • March

    USACE Division Deputies visit Memphis for Summit, Engineer Yard tour

    U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Division Deputies recently met in Memphis, Tennessee, for a Deputies Summit and tour of the Memphis District area. "The USACE HQ Deputy Summit enables the MSC/Centers/Labs and 249th Engineer Battalion (Prime Power) Deputies to share lessons learned, best practices and engage key HQs staff on Enterprise challenges, policies, and processes in order to Take Care of our People, Support National Readiness, Modernize, Strengthen Partnerships, and Revolutionize Delivery," Mississippi Valley Division Deputy Division Engineer Col. Jeremy Chapman said.
  • Project Makeover: Tractor Shop Breakroom

    The Memphis District's skilled tradesmen are at it again, demoing and remodeling one building at a time until they've covered every structure in need of a makeover at Ensley Engineer Yard. Recently, a team of mechanics, electricians, carpenters, pipefitters, HVAC technicians, and revetment workers all got together to completely renovate the Tractor Shop’s breakroom, literally from the ground up.
  • Employee Spotlight: Carla Wells

    In any business, it’s the people that make it work. Without them, organizations ultimately fail. That’s why the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District values each and every one of its employees so much. To show how much we do, we highlight one employee every month by asking a few questions about the position they’re in and how they got to where they are today. This month, we are highlighting Carla Wells. She is a government purchase card business manager for the Contracting/Oversight Branch.
  • Associated General Contractors of America Event a success

    The Mississippi Valley Associated General Contractors of America (MVAGC) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division (MVD) met for an event known as the Mississippi Valley Construction Roundtable, which was held in downtown Memphis, Tennessee, this year on Feb. 18 and 19. “The meeting between the Mississippi Valley Branch of the AGC and Mississippi Valley Division of the Corps of Engineers offers an opportunity for staff from the division headquarters and six districts to interact with our contracting partners who help us deliver our program,” Construction Branch Chief Jim Wolff said. “Through two key meetings (the Dredging Issues Roundtable and the Construction Specifications Session Roundtable), open communication, and frank discussion, we identify issues or problems related to dredging, construction, and contracting. These meetings offer member contractors an open forum to develop potential solutions to solve issues or problems.”
  • December

    Hurley docked after another successful dredging season

    After almost eight months of dredging the Mississippi River, the Dredge Hurley and crew are now home where the Hurley is docked at Ensley Engineer Yard for some much-needed repairs and maintenance.
  • November

    Giving back where it matters most

    According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the percentage of Americans without work skyrocketed from a little over 4 percent to a full-blown 14 percent between March and April this year. While that number has dwindled down in percentage points from month to month, it's still nowhere near where we were before our country was hit with COVID-19 and consequently suffered a significant collapse in the job market. This is part of what motivated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District's Brian Schneider. Schneider is the district's Outreach Coordinator and has been with the Memphis District for just over a year. As his title suggests, he's passionate about reaching out, and that's just what he did when this opportunity presented itself.
  • July

    Bank Grading Unit paves way for commerce, safety

    Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller recently visited Island 68, a project site in Arkansas, where he met with the district’s hardworking Bank Grading Unit and reviewed progress made at the site thus far. According to Project Manager and River/Civil Engineer Cole Stonebrook, we have done work here before as this area is particularly erosive and scours easily in moving water. “The soils in the area are very unstable and highly erosive,” he said. “We are addressing a large bank failure by grading irregularities in the bank alignment to a smooth straight alignment. The Grading Unit is grading the banks to a one on four slope,  which requires moving 220,000 cubic yards of material.”
  • June

    Slide repairs contracted in four states

    The Memphis District's Caruthersville Area Office team successfully held a virtual preconstruction conference to discuss contracts awarded for future levee slide repairs in Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, and Tennessee.  “The contracts furnish all plant, labor, equipment, and any incidental-related work according to the plans and specifications for repairing 18 slides under Work Area Three and 14 slides under Work Area Four for a total of 32 slides,” Lead Civil Engineer Jack Ratliff said.
  • Memphis District Commander tours several project sites

    Memphis District Commander Col. Zachary Miller had a busy day June 17 kicking off a summer full of visiting several of the district's project sites in our area of responsibility. Encompassing almost 25,000 square miles, the Memphis District is responsible for federal civil works projects in portions of six states - Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee.
  • Memphis Revetment Season in full swing

    The Memphis District Revetment season officially began this year on June 11, with District Commander Col. Zachary Miller hosting a kickoff meeting at the Ensley Engineer Yard to get things started. “Protecting the Mississippi River banks keeps the channel in place, which maintains the necessary depth and alignment that allows the thousands of tows to travel up and down the river year round,” the commander said. “Without this work, the river would shift resulting in new, shallow cutoffs that could not be safely traveled.”
  • May

    Metal Shop makings...

    Navigation is one of our oldest missions. We’re mandated by Congress to keep the Mississippi River open for commercial navigation by maintaining a 9-foot-deep and 300-foot-wide channel, and we do that by dredging on an annual basis. So, as one might imagine, our dustpan dredge, the Hurley, gets used quite a bit keeping the Mississippi open, so our talented team at Ensley Engineer Yard have their work cut out for them keeping her running year after year. This brings us to the project Machinist Brandon Almeida is working on – it’s something the Dredge Hurley uses called “propeller rope guards.” He’s also making the mount needed to make the rope guards on – talk about complex work.