Keeping the river open for business, dredging contract awarded

Published June 24, 2022
IN THE PHOTO,  Representatives of Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, International Port of Memphis and USACE. (Courtesy photo)

IN THE PHOTO, Representatives of Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, International Port of Memphis and USACE. (Courtesy photo)

IN THE PHOTOS, Inland Dredging Company's cutterhead dredge "Integrity" (not the same contractor for this year’s contract) works to dredge the Memphis Harbor/McKellar Lake, which was the last of 10 harbors dredged in the Memphis District during contract award work during the 2019 year. (USACE photos/Jessica Haas)

IN THE PHOTOS, Inland Dredging Company's cutterhead dredge "Integrity" (not the same contractor for this year’s contract) works to dredge the Memphis Harbor/McKellar Lake, which was the last of 10 harbors dredged in the Memphis District during contract award work during the 2019 year. (USACE photos/Jessica Haas)

The Memphis District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for keeping the Mississippi River open for commercial navigation year-round. One way the district does this is through contract dredging, which keeps the river channel at a depth that allows the river barge industry to dependably transport goods up and down the river.

Ensuring the district delivers on this charge, the Memphis District recently awarded a contract in the amount of $7,335,450 to Great Lakes Dredge and Dock, LLC for the rental of a 24-inch hydraulic cutterhead dredge, discharge pipe, and attendant plant. The contract was awarded June 2, 2022, with an anticipated completion date of Feb. 28, 2023.

A total of nine harbors were awarded, with actual dredging scheduled to take place from July 1, 2022, through December 2022.

Harbors to be dredged include the Memphis Harbor/McKellar Lake, Wolf River Harbor, Elvis Stahr Harbor, Helena Harbor Phillips County, Northwest Tennessee Regional Harbor, Caruthersville Harbor, Helena Harbor, New Madrid County Harbor, and Osceola Harbor.

“Dredging these harbors involves removing sediment from the authorized navigation channel to maintain a specific depth for safe navigation in and out of the harbors,” Project Delivery Team Manager Vickie Watson said. “The Memphis District is responsible for maintenance dredging of ten harbors along the Mississippi River. These harbors serve as vital links to rail and highway transportation systems in the region, helping to deliver products and commodities to and from global markets.”

Congratulations and many thanks to the project delivery team, who, without their hard work, this contract award would not have been possible: Project Manager Vickie Watson, Stephen (Wade) Channell (Navigation), Danny Hunt (Navigation), Program Analyst Phoebe Rucker, and Contracting Specialist Judy Stallion.

And many thanks to our project sponsors and partners for their support: Memphis Harbor/McKellar Lake: Mr. Randy Richardson, International Port of Memphis, Tennessee; Wolf River Harbor: Mr. Robert Knecht, City of Memphis, Tennessee; Elvis Stahr Harbor: Mr. Greg Curling, Hickman-Fulton County Riverport, Authority, Hickman, Kentucky; Helena Harbor Phillips County: Mr. John Edward, Phillips County Port Authority, Helena-West Helena, Arkansas; Northwest Tennessee Regional Harbor: Jimmy William Port of Cates Landing, Tiptonville, Tennessee; Caruthersville Harbor: Mr. John Ferguson, II Pemiscot County Port Authority, Caruthersville, Missouri; Helena Harbor: Mayor Kevin Smith, Helena-West Helena, Arkansas; New Madrid County Harbor: Mrs. Timmie Lynn Hunter, New Madrid Port Authority, City of New Madrid, Missouri; and Osceola Harbor, Mayor Sally Longo Wilson, City of Osceola, Arkansas.

Maintenance efforts executed through contract awards like this ensures river traffic can navigate the Mississippi River safely and reliably. Congratulations, team, and thank you for an outstanding job completed.