$1.8M contract awarded, add’ l protection for agriculture, communities

Published Aug. 8, 2022
IN BOTH PHOTOS, Pictured is the area of concern, the project area, which is specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photos)

Pictured is the area of concern, the project area, which is specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photos)

IN THE PHOTO (to the right),Biologist Josh Koontz, Cost Engineer Max Gomez-Pedro, Design Engineer Chase Kesner, and Geotechnical Engineer Ben Tatum visit a potential borrow site with Bill Sheppard of Yazoo Mississippi Delta Board.  (This was not the final borrow site.) Circled in red is poison ivy.  The other two photos (to the left) are of the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photos)

IN THE PHOTO (to the right),Biologist Josh Koontz, Cost Engineer Max Gomez-Pedro, Design Engineer Chase Kesner, and Geotechnical Engineer Ben Tatum visit a potential borrow site with Bill Sheppard of Yazoo Mississippi Delta Board. (This was not the final borrow site.) Circled in red is poison ivy. The other two photos (to the left) are of the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photos)

IN THE PHOTO, Biologist Josh Koontz, Cost Engineer Max Gomez-Pedro, Design Engineer Chase Kesner, and Geotechnical Engineer Ben Tatum visit a potential borrow site with Bill Sheppard of Yazoo Mississippi Delta Board.  (This was not the final borrow site.) (USACE Courtesy Photo)

IN THE PHOTO, Biologist Josh Koontz, Cost Engineer Max Gomez-Pedro, Design Engineer Chase Kesner, and Geotechnical Engineer Ben Tatum visit a potential borrow site with Bill Sheppard of Yazoo Mississippi Delta Board. (This was not the final borrow site.) (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

Pictured is the project area, specifically four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee System 21 – Segment 26. The $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high. (USACE Courtesy Photo)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Memphis District recently awarded a construction contract for a Seepage Remediation Project in Coahoma County, Sherard, Mississippi.

The project will be accomplished in partnership with the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee Board of Mississippi and will address four miles of the Yazoo-Delta Levee system’s System 21 – Segment 26.

Specifically, Project Manager Marsha Raus said, “This $1.8 million job will construct three earthen berms (within an approximate four-mile-long levee reach) to reduce seepage under the levee when river levels are high.”

“This will increase the resiliency and reliability of the levee that provides protection for the agriculture lands and communities in Coahoma County, Mississippi,” Raus added.

In addition to thanking project partner Yazoo-Mississippi Delta Levee Board of Mississippi, the Memphis District would also like to thank and congratulate the Project Delivery Team for reaching such an important milestone.

Project Delivery Team Members include Project Manager Marsha Raus, Technical Lead and Geotechnical Engineer Ben Tatum, Design Engineer Chase Kesner, Biologist Josh Koontz, Cost Engineer Max Gomez-Pedro, Construction Representative Del Warfield, Hydraulics & Hydrology Engineer Robert Gambill, Contracting Specialist Judy Stallion, Program Analyst Martamara Richard, Program Analyst Stacy Carlson, Real Estate Specialist Brian Johnson, and Real Estate Specialist Clayton Burford.

Congratulations again to all involved in meeting this significant tasker!